CLICK HERE FOR INDEX PAGE

THE MARKING GAUGE

V. Ryan © 2003 - 2009

 

PDF FILE - CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE WORKSHEET

A marking gauge is used to mark a line parallel to a straight edge. The stem and stock are made from beech and the thumbscrew from clear yellow plastic. The better quality gauges have brass inserts at the front of the stock. These help reduce the wear on the stock as it is pushed against the surface of the wood - to be marked. The marking gauge is an extremely important tool for marking parallel lines and preparing for cutting joints.

 
   

   

The gauge has a sharp point called a spur. This is made from hardened steel and is the part that ‘scribes’ the line into the surface of the wood. The distance between the stock and the spur can be adjusted by loosening the thumbscrew which allows the stock to slide along the stem. The thumbscrew can then be tightened once the correct distance has been reached. A ruler is used to set the distance (see diagram opposite).
If the spur is replaced with a small knife it is now called a cutting gauge and is used for cutting lines into solid wood surfaces in preparation for veneering or inlaying.

ALTERING THE DISTANCE BETWEEN THE SPUR AND STOCK

     

MARKING WITH THE GAUGE

The wood is held firmly to the bench by a G cramp or bench hook. The stock of the marking gauge is pressed firmly against a straight edge of the wood and pushed carefully along it. A little pressure is applied to the spur, too much pressure and the spur digs into the wood marking an ugly line on the surface.
It is a good idea to lightly scribe a line along the surface first and then repeat the process two or three times until an accurate scribed line can be seen.

 
   

QUESTIONS

1. Practice using a marking gauge until you have mastered the process.
2. Draw a marking gauge and label each part.

   

CLICK HERE FOR EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES INDEX

     
   
Google
 
Web www.technologystudent.com